Contacts

Contact persons

Nicola Fiore

LifeWatch ERIC

nicola.fiore[@]lifewatch.eu

Zhiming Zhao

University of Amsterdam

z.zhao[at]uva.nl

Travel

From Brindisi Airport:

Approximate distance: 50 km

  • By Bus: Take bus COTRAP (the bus stop is on the right of arrival area). The bus takes about 40 minutes and it stops to Lecce at the Foro Boario/City Terminal.
  • By Air-Shuttle: Shuttle service specialised in transporting passengers to and from Brindisi Airport and their Hotels with rates of 20 euros. You can book your transportation online at www.airshuttle.it.

 

From Bari Airport:

Approximate distance: 150 km

You should take the train from the airport to the central train station and then take the train to Lecce (please visit www.trenitalia.it to check the time schedule).

Internal Joint Initiative 2

Rationale for the Internal Joint Initiative

The warnings of 15,000 scientists, of the United Nations Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21) and now of the UN Global Assessment Study clearly demonstrate that humanity is bringing our life support system, the biosphere, to the point of collapse. The effort to counteract this current loss of biodiversity requires concrete actions at all levels. For science, it means improving our current level of knowledge, to move beyond the present fragmentation of science, and to foster greater complementarity and synergy between disciplines, by developing new inter-disciplinary paradigms and starting to build synthetic knowledge, so as to boost innovation and involve more young scientists and civil society.

LifeWatch ERIC is Europe’s first line of response to this emergency, applying and advancing ICT technologies, web networks, interconnecting scientific communities and research centres internationally into its web-based research infrastructure.

Objectives

The Internal Joint and Collaborative Initiative (IJI) has been created in order to:

  1. Boost the integration of tools and services into the LifeWatch ERIC web portal
  2. Focus on a major scientific issue in biodiversity and ecosystem research with relevant socio-economic implications in different fields;
  3. Produce new and synthetic knowledge that is needed by institutions, administrations and managers to give solutions to major environmental problems at different scales;
  4. Involve the LifeWatch ERIC National scientific communities, key international research groups and other European research Infrastructures with related interests and running activities; and,
  5. Make this effort an example of the functioning of the LifeWatch ERIC e-Infrastructure through its dissemination and outreach activities.

The topic of non-indigenous and invasive species (NIS) has been chosen as the first demonstration case of the functioning of the LifeWatch ERIC e-Infrastructure. The development of virtual research environments within the e-Infrastructure will help address some of the main issues on NIS in the field of ecosystem and habitat type vulnerability and in the context of climate change as well as help highlight societal needs and potential solutions to be tested.

ENVRIplus LifeWatch International Summer School

International Summer School “Data Management in Environmental & Earth Science Infrastructures: Theory & Practice”

Lecce, 9 – 13 July 2018

In recent years, one of the major challenges in the Environmental and Earth Science has been managing and searching ever larger volumes of data, collected across multiple disciplines. The ENVRIplus project investigated a collection of more than 20 representative environmental research infrastructures (RIs) from different areas. By examining these research infrastructures and their characteristics, a common data lifecycle was identified. The data lifecycle is structured in five phases: Data Acquisition, Data Curation, Data Publishing, Data Processing and Data Use. Many different standards, approaches, and tools have been developed to support the Data Lifecycle. In particular, modern semantic technologies provide a promising way to properly describe and interrelate different data sources in ways that reduce barriers to data discovery, integration, and exchange among biodiversity and ecosystem resources and researchers.

The course is built as a five-day summer school providing a unique insight into the contemporary debate on Data Management in the environmental and earth sciences. Leading scientists and experienced technical specialists will address this topic from different angles, attempting to gather what we consider the most interesting perspectives of our time. We offer a cutting edge and high-quality programme, aimed at fostering a rich and lively intellectual exchange.

Participants:

Early bird registration will close on 15 June 2018. Afterwards, it will still be possible to register, but participants will have to fully cover their own costs.

The International Summer School on “Data Management in Environmental and Earth Science Infrastructures: theory and practice” is organised by the ENVRIplus project in collaboration with the LifeWatch e-Infrastructure.

The school is mainly addressed at staff working in relevant international research infrastructures. The school is also open to PhD students and post-doctoral researchers. Master’s students about to start a doctorate will also be accepted. (max 20 participants).

Participation is free of charge.

Communication Materials

Magazine

Starting in March 2022, LifeWatch ERIC will broadcast a regular series of podcasts on the Internal Joint Initiative, open conversations with key personnel within the infrastructure, the scientists behind the validation cases, and other Research Institutes who have benefited from our Tesseract technologies in their own investigation of biodiversity and ecosystems in Europe. The first season introduces LifeWatch ERIC, Non-indigenous Invasive Species and the Virtual Research Environment. Season two will feature interviews with key personnel behind the validation cases.

 
 
 

 

 
>

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 

 

You can also listen to the podcasts on the following platforms:

Science, like music, has a language all its own, that can appear difficult understand to the uninitiated. Because the development of the new Virtual Research Environment capable of reporting environmental issues on a global scale is actually of relevance to everyone on the planet, LifeWatch ERIC is breaking new ground in publishing a magazine, called “Alien Alert!”, to appeal to more general audiences.

In non-scientific terms, “Alien Alert!” presents the history of the LifeWatch ERIC Internal Joint Initiative in narrative form: how five research cases into habitats affected by Non-indigenous and Invasive Species have validated a more powerful and comprehensive cloud-based virtual laboratory than was ever available previously. We hope this informal approach makes the serious business of safeguarding biodiversity more accessible.

Warning: no prizes for solving the two crossword puzzles! – solutions will be revealed by clicking on the boxes below. 

To download the magazine, click on the three little dots.

It’s not easy to see into the future. Sometimes it takes a special ability, sometimes an unusual machine, to interpret the present and project a picture of what might be, or what will be. And creating that future can mean drawing on traditions that didn’t usually work together, to make surprising new combinations.

That is precisely what the Internal Joint Initiative (IJI) does.  LifeWatch ERIC brought together cross-disciplinary teams – of informaticians, genetic ecologists, software designers, biodiversity researchers, data managers and modellers – to create a new visionary Virtual Research Environment. 

In this collection of videos on the IJI, members and collaborators of LifeWatch ERIC explain the rationale behind the Initiative and present the work done over the last two years and that continues into the future.

Contacts

Nicola Fiore | LifeWatch ERIC | nicola.fiore(at)lifewatch.eu

Lucia Vaira | LifeWatch ERIC | lucia.vaira(at)lifewatch.eu

Zhiming Zhao | University of Amsterdam | z.zhao(at)uva.nl

Trainers

Day 1 - Monday, Sept. 27

 

Malcolm Atkinson

Malcolm Atkinson was recruited as the inaugural Director of the UK National eScience Centre and eScience Institute in 2001. He led eScience until 2011, stimulating eResearch throughout the UK and building a vibrant global legacy. In Edinburgh this is manifest in the Software Sustainability Institute and the Data Curation Centre, both with global influence. Since completing his EPSRC senior research fellowship as UK eScience Envoy in 2011 Malcolm has continued eScience research with BBSRC, EPSRC, EU, NERC, PPARC and SHEFC funding in the School of Informatics. His research focuses on helping people and organisations share and exploit data and to recognise and overcome the human, organisational and technical barriers that limit our ability to extract and use vital evidence latent in data. Building on eScience and on EU projects (he has led them continuously since 1989), Malcolm was the architect of a series of EU and UK projects delivering improved platforms to facilitate data-intensive research. This includes medical images for stroke diagnosis, the use of seismic data and models for risk assessment and hazard-response and of climate data for impact modelling. He worked with 23 European strategic research infrastructures in environmental sciences to help them recognise useful commonalities in their data requirements, pushing them to budget to sustain software just as they would for their instruments as they depend on both. Now, he hopes to improve the use of Scottish retinal-image data.

 

Andreas Petzold

Andreas is an atmospheric scientist with longstanding experience in the measurement of climate relevant aerosol optical properties across the troposphere in various environments. Today, he is heading the Research Group for Global Observation at the Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Troposphere (IEK-8) of Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany. He is also member of Faculty of the Physics Department of University of Wuppertal and serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Group Aerosols of the Global Atmosphere Watch programme of WMO. One of his primary tasks is the coordination of the European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (www.iagos.org), jointly with colleagues from France and the U.K. As a convinced supporter of the concept of research infrastructures, he is contributing to the Community of the European Environmental Research Infrastructures ENVRI and coordinates the EU Project ENVRI-FAIR which connects the cluster of ENVRIs to the European Open Science Cloud.

 

Rita Gomes
Rita Gomes is a Software Engineer with a strong focus in Data Science. Having majored in Information Technologies and in later Data Science, she has worked for different industries during several years, in fields like telecommunications and insurance. Driven by her passion for the environment, she joined IAGOS almost 2 years ago, where she mostly works with software development and data analysis, in a close connection with scientists. She is currently taking an MSc in Artificial Intelligence and is the technical co-lead of the exciting ENVRI-Hub project, where she gets to work with all the ENVRI community.

Nicola Fiore
Nicola Fiore is the ICT Coordinator of the LifeWatch ERIC Service Centre. He is Dr. Eng. Computer Science and PhD in Computer Engineering. He has 17 years of working experience in IT, in the field of the design and development of Information Systems in both the private and public sectors, and 10 years of accredited professional experience in the area of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Bioinformatics research. His research activities include the definition of common policies, models and e-infrastructure to optimise technological implementation; definition of workflows; and coordination, harmonisation, integration and interoperability of data, applications and other services. He is one of the member of the Vocabulary Services Interest Group leading the Ontology Market Place working group in the framework of the Research Data Alliance.

Day 2 - Wednesday, Sept. 29

 

Zhiming Zhao
Zhiming Zhao is an assistant professor at University of Amsterdam (UvA). He leads the “Quality Critical Distributed Computing” research team in the group of Multiscale Networked Systems (MNS) at the System and Networking Lab (SNE). His research interests include big data management, Cloud and edge computing, software engineering, and blockchain. He leads the development support WP in ENVRI-FAIR and the VRE development in the LifeWatch-ERIC Dutch Virtual Laboratory Innovation Center. He is also the UvA PI in SWITCH, ENVRIplus, ARTICONF and several other projects.

 

Oleg Mirzov
Oleg Mirzov has been originally educated as a physicist, but his long interest in programming and desire to organize research papers in a semantically meaningful way have lured him away into the world of ontologies first, and into the trade of professional software development soon after. He has worked as a data janitor, ontologist, and full-stack software developer since 2008, and as a systems architect/lead developer at ICOS Carbon Portal since 2015.

 

Alessandro Spinuso
Dr. Alessandro Spinuso is a senior researcher at the R&D Observations and Data Technology division of the KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute). He earned his PhD in Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh (UK) in 2018. At KNMI, he covers the roles of Project Leader and Product Owner within an Agile R&D team developing Provenance-aware Data Analysis services. The team is also involved in designing and implementing systems for the future KNMI Early Warning Center. His main research interest is the management and the exploitation of provenance information in the context of user controlled computational environments providing interactive tools and workflows for data-driven analysis. He is involved in several EU initiatives focusing on the development of e-science infrastructures for Earth Science research in Europe (EPOS, ENVRIFair, IS-ENES3, DARE, C3S). More recently, he is an invited expert to the IPCC TG-Data. This is a working group dedicated to the FAIR management of the data and methods that will be published in the next IPCC reports.

 

Antonio José Sáenz-Albanés
Antonio José Sáenz-Albanés is the ICT e-Infrastructure Operations Coordinator of LifeWatch ERIC. He received a Diploma in Engineering & Technology of Information from the University of Seville. He has 29 years of IT experience in both the private and public sectors. For ten years, he was PM of the “Centro de Gestión Avanzada” for IT-supported educational centres in Andalusia. He was CTO of a private company for ten years, responsible for all the ICT teams, managing every aspect of production and operations such as recruiting, training, strategic selection of technologies and partners, development and services methodologies, (ISO 9001:2000 using RUP-agile, ITIL, ISO 27000, CMMi). He deployed several VREs: nation-wide electric grid planning, improvement and adaptation of the biological station of Doñana to LifeWatch, and scenario-based water innovation and research laboratory. He was also Associated Lecturer in Languages & Information Systems at the University of Seville.

Day 3 - Friday, Oct. 1

 

Luca Cervone
Born in San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy) July 12th 1981. He got the scientific high school diploma in 2001 at the Liceo Scientifico Statale Generoso De Rogatis of San Nicandro Garganico (Italy). On December 19th 2006, he obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science at the University of Bologna. He completed his undergraduate studies obtaining a Master’s degree with honors in Internet Science on November 14th 2013 at the University of Bologna. In January 2007 he began his collaboration with the University of Bologna, in particular with the CIRSFID (Interdepartmental Centre for Research in Legal History, Philosophy and Sociology of Law and Legal Informatics), and worked in several research groups and projects for 12 years. In July 2014 he became a PhD in Legal Informatics. Now, his works and research are focused in using Web Technologies and Blockchain technologies to improve researches in Public Research Centers and Administrations.

Day 4 - Monday, Oct. 4

 

Antoni Huguet-Vives
ICT engineer specialized in front-end with a background in computer graphics and animation. Antoni spends his days as a front-end architect for the LifeWatch ICT Core team where he gets the chance to integrate the work of many other ICT colleagues and translate it into user friendly interfaces. Fond of human-centred design to enhance user satisfaction, human well-being, accessibility and sustainability.

Day 5 - Wednesday, Oct. 6

 

Malcolm Atkinson

Malcolm Atkinson was recruited as the inaugural Director of the UK National eScience Centre and eScience Institute in 2001. He led eScience until 2011, stimulating eResearch throughout the UK and building a vibrant global legacy. In Edinburgh this is manifest in the Software Sustainability Institute and the Data Curation Centre, both with global influence. Since completing his EPSRC senior research fellowship as UK eScience Envoy in 2011 Malcolm has continued eScience research with BBSRC, EPSRC, EU, NERC, PPARC and SHEFC funding in the School of Informatics. His research focuses on helping people and organisations share and exploit data and to recognise and overcome the human, organisational and technical barriers that limit our ability to extract and use vital evidence latent in data. Building on eScience and on EU projects (he has led them continuously since 1989), Malcolm was the architect of a series of EU and UK projects delivering improved platforms to facilitate data-intensive research. This includes medical images for stroke diagnosis, the use of seismic data and models for risk assessment and hazard-response and of climate data for impact modelling. He worked with 23 European strategic research infrastructures in environmental sciences to help them recognise useful commonalities in their data requirements, pushing them to budget to sustain software just as they would for their instruments as they depend on both. Now, he hopes to improve the use of Scottish retinal-image data.

Antonio José Sáenz-Albanés
Antonio José Sáenz-Albanés is the ICT e-Infrastructure Operations Coordinator of LifeWatch ERIC. He received a Diploma in Engineering & Technology of Information from the University of Seville. He has 29 years of IT experience in both the private and public sectors. For ten years, he was PM of the “Centro de Gestión Avanzada” for IT-supported educational centres in Andalusia. He was CTO of a private company for ten years, responsible for all the ICT teams, managing every aspect of production and operations such as recruiting, training, strategic selection of technologies and partners, development and services methodologies, (ISO 9001:2000 using RUP-agile, ITIL, ISO 27000, CMMi). He deployed several VREs: nation-wide electric grid planning, improvement and adaptation of the biological station of Doñana to LifeWatch, and scenario-based water innovation and research laboratory. He was also Associated Lecturer in Languages & Information Systems at the University of Seville.